The Reluctant Christian and the Lone Wolf

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My husband and I attend a Unitarian Universalist Church. If you’re interested in which one, I’ll post their website.

I don’t plan on becoming a UU even in light of the recent developments in my renouncing mainstream Christianity for (hopefully) the last time. I haven’t made any movements to officially move my church member records from the Episcopal Church, but when I become a member of a Gnostic Church, that will happen, and there my records will go, and there my records will stay.

To become UU would not solve the problem; to be a sort of nominal UU solves the problem because, as one teacher one said, it’s a good idea to find a group of like-minded individuals, or you’re going to have a hard time.

No, I don’t have to agree with the secular humanists or pagans or anyone else who attends the UU; rather, I can love them and have them love me in return and experience a profound level of community among fellow seekers. However, to declare myself one of them might actually compromise my integrity- I like them, I sympathize with them, but I am not, at heart, one of them, and to declare myself so would be compromise in what I actually want, but more so, what I actually need.

I should point out that I will always, always, ALWAYS be fond of the time I spent at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Ozark, Alabama; I have nothing negative to say about my former priest or the parishioners there.

My issue is something I’ve highlighted before; where my spiritual quest, and where it’s going, is somewhere beyond the reach of where most people are currently. That isn’t to pat myself on the back, I’m just trying to explain that while I would recommend the Episcopal Church to anyone who is comfortable with mainstream Christianity as a sort of liberal alternative to Catholicism and so on, I can’t profess doctrines or uphold views that I have constantly qualify.

I’m more involved, along with my husband, at the UU Church than I’ve ever been in any other organization. But then, I realize, I’ve been attending there with him longer than I’ve been attending the Episcopal Church, at least at THIS point.

The other night at the Humanism Class, in context of the discussion, I referred to myself as a “Reluctant Christian.”

I’m reluctant for many reasons, not the least of which is the extremely ridiculous history of mainstream Christianity; I feel like I’m trying to salvage diamonds out of shit at times.

Yet the diamonds in question are often worth the battle.

My home state of Alabama recently had Marriage Equality push forward. Naturally, the bigots in the state have fought and fought and fought the Marriage Equality ruling, and the self-styled Real, True Christians are commenting profusely online.

The usual comments are people slinging Bible verses everywhere or saying God defined marriage as between one man and one woman, and I just have to roll my eyes…or troll the people, depending on how I feel.

Because seriously, I don’t know who decided that firing off Bible verses would convince anyone, but it doesn’t. Ever. If anything, people get tired of seeing Bible verses that are taken out of context and don’t hold any authority over them anyway- the Dead Letter of the Scriptures cannot save us and has never saved us.

And like, if this is the way Christians behave, who the hell wants to be a Christian? I’m thoroughly confused about what’s appealing in mainstream Christianity, and the promise that I won’t burn forever in some hypothetical and probably derived-from-bad-theological-readings Hell isn’t really enough of a motivation.

I finally gave up fighting the heresy label. I just don’t fucking care anymore- by God, I’m a heretic, and I’m proud of being a heretic if it means I don’t get lumped in with all those blithering idiots out that follow the American Bible Religion.

The question is, why even bother with Christianity at all? But yes. There are good things there, even if the good things are in the minority. I need the potency of the Holy Eucharist; I need my prayer beads and my crucifixes and my iconography; I need my Scriptures talking about Sophia’s repentances. Because then my spirit is quiet, and I can slowly fall in love with God again and again, each time the same and yet different, each time a stillness and a movement.

Since I’m probably effectively the only Gnostic Christian at the UU Fellowship, I like to think of myself as the “Lone Wolf.” Yeah. I like that title. Makes me feel special.

My heart does go out to Alabama and to the many, MANY couples there who now have the right to marry but are facing bigots who tell them they can’t, and moreover, the many bigots who seem to be under the erroneous impression that their own point of view is the dominant one.

Judge Roy Moore is an embarrassment. They kicked him out of one time for doing something similar, and people mocked me for being from Alabama and asked if Roy Moore thought he was the Second Coming of Jesus.

Not only is he an embarrassment, he unfortunately reinforces the stereotypes about Alabama AND mainstream Christianity. His attitude is exactly the sort of thing that holds society back and causes the anti-theists to have a field day mocking all religion. Good grief.

I wish I could be charitable; in reality, no matter the injustice, these are just the death cries. Come the summer, the Supreme Court of the USA will rule in favor of Marriage Equality, the idiocy will have to completely stop then, and that aspect of the battle will be done. Non-discrimination policies are a different thing, though.

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Several Things

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Yesterday, I attended the local Unitarian Universalist church with my boyfriend. We swap each Sunday; one Sunday, we attend Mass, and the next, we attend the UU church. So it goes.

The presentation yesterday at the UU church had to do largely with a specific minister who fought for civil rights. One interesting aspect of the minister is that he had originally been a highly devout Presbyterian, and then the speaker went on to explain that this minister eventually “outgrew the bounds and confines of the Protestantism which he had once found so meaningful.”

So, this brings me to an excellent point, something I take for granted: my return to Christianity is actually on those same terms. I have RETURNED to the faith in which I was raised already expanded well outside the well-meaning but often flawed notion of orthodoxy. I’ve been playing ego-games here, I suppose, in attempting to find which strain of Christianity actually represents most closely the mystical views I already hold.

My being an Anglo-Catholic mystic has largely been an exercise in finding a place that was traditional enough in ritual but liberal enough socially and perhaps theologically for me to be able to practice the mysteries. I would say that even closer theologically to the mysticism I espouse is Eastern Orthodoxy.

But the trouble is that I’ve been attempting to put myself inside a box in which I frankly don’t fit. Yes, I did return to the Church via the modern Gnostics and the modern Gnosticism, largely the Ecclesia Gnostica and the Apostolic Johannite Church. Their online presence has given the tools necessary to enter into the stream of Christianity and relate to Christ on that level.

One guy I used to know said something to this effect: “I like Christianity for its mystical aspects. Other than that, it can go to hell.”

And now, I find myself largely agreeing.

Christianity is one of those strange beasts in which a lot of good is mixed with a lot of bad, or worse, a lot of outright bullshit. Constantly, we’re faced with a group of people who confuse their political positions of power as having genuine theological backings. We’re faced with people who rely on ancient hypotheses that not only have been proven incorrect but can be invalidated by commonsense and simply observation, yet they cling tenaciously to the falsehoods and perversions that earlier Christians gained from their cultural surroundings. 

But we can also not throw out the baby with the baptismal water. The issue is that, for instance, the New Atheists will look at all the bullshit and decry the ENTIRE religion to be bullshit. At worst, this is characterized as people simply making up all the religious aspects to actually cloak their political agendas.

This denies the fact that many of the people involved in a religion take the religion sincerely. Given, you always have the nutters who take it way too seriously and lose sight of the goal and are ready to burn people at the stake.

The Church has a huge issue in that it seems to pick and choose what is Eternally Bound Truth. At certain times, it emphasizes this or that, proclaiming is the Truth-Once-Given-for-All, and then, later on, perhaps that’s suddenly not so important. 

Our current example of this is with same-sex marriage. Homosexuality is not a central issue in Christianity or the history of theology. Homosexuality is not something that makes or breaks one’s Christianity or Catholicity or mysticism. It’s just not central to establishing what’s considered orthodox or unorthodox, yet the Church has politicized the entire issue as the standard of whom is and isn’t a “Real, True Christian.”

Homosexuality is considered a sin. Well, last time I checked, technically, pirating music is also considered stealing, and stealing is a sin; I have YET to see the Church make a huge political agenda and pour millions of dollars into convincing people that teenagers pirating online music are destroying the natural order of God’s Creation and are in danger of going to Hell. 

The same thing is true of things like Gluttony. Why hasn’t the Church attacked McDonald’s and the fast food chains? Places such as McDonald’s practically enable people to commit gluttony because of how cheap the food is (Dollar Menu, anyone?). 

Though, I will say THIS for the Church: the Catholics (Anglicans, Orthodox, Romans, you know the drill) may say that homosexuality is sinful, but I don’t recall any recent statements by them that gay people are going to burn in Hell forever. I do know that the Evangelicals are more forthright with that kind of statement, so I’ll give the older traditions that much.

Anyway, I’ve gotten off track here.

The point is, what does a person do when they come to Christianity with views that are already too big for the Mainstream Church and when there are no esoteric Churches around and about? Defaulting to the Episcopal Church still took me five years or so, and now, I walk around all huffy and puffy because it seems like we can’t get our shit together and do the liturgy correctly. 

So much for my ranting.

Coming soon: a blog about Gnostic priest Tony Silvia’s new book, 

Sanctuary of the Sacred Flame: A Guide to Johannite Spiritual Practice. 

Ranting

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Technically, it isn’t THAT late at night, but that’s beside the point.

Thoughts cross my mind concerning orthodoxy and heresy. Thoughts cross my mind on the place of the Bible in things.

The problem that happens with Catholic Christendom is that the notion that consensus makes reality. Well, no, it doesn’t…several people can vote on something and be entirely incorrect on it. The notion that Protestants just individually make up whatever they want to believe about the Bible is a gross misrepresentation of the notion of individual conscience on matters.

The biggest issue in my mind right now is that it’s difficult to come across a tradition of Christianity that is liturgical AND progressive. Some would cry, “The Episcopal Church!” (of which I am an official member), but so often, I’ve noticed the Church falls short of its actual banter about being so liturgiacally high.

I’ve been to several different Episcopal Churches in the Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast, and I can tell you that none of them do the liturgy 100% “correctly,” if I may put it that way. Each parish, in some way, botches the liturgy or leaves out something that I see as integral to the process.

Some people seem to think that my concern over bad liturgy or liturgical deficiencies is outmoded and that we should just get on with the important things. The issue I take is that the liturgy represents something very powerful and important: our own relationship to God, and our own ego’s relationship to our higher selves.

THIS is why so many of us are so gung-ho about the ritual being carried out properly; the ritual is a statement about how we relate to our Higher Self. So, when the liturgy is carried about sloppily, it’s as though we don’t really take our Higher Self seriously; it’s a slap in the face to the Indwelling Christ.

No, I don’t think the Mass should have a single, uniform expression from which it never deviates. That is not the point. Even the Star Trek Mass of the Book of Common Prayer (Eucharistic Prayer C) can be effective if it’s done with due reverence, intention, and the correct liturgical gestures.

(As a matter of interest, my favorite Eucharistic Prayer is D. However, I have yet to hear a priest say Mass with it.)

But there are certain gestures, certain ritual actions that should not be left out. The Host should always be elevated; the Chalice should always be elevated; the Host and Chalice should always be elevated in the Lesser Elevation at the end.

Anyway, I shall address one more issue, and then be done here.

I take issue with the notion of Christian Unity. I’ve seen some who would say that we should not divide ourselves, that we should not call ourselves Baptist or Catholic or whatever but only refer to ourselves as merely “Christian.” 

This is an action taken out of ignorance, I think, as it attempts to deny the differences in theology and emphases given in various traditions. On one level, sure, I can understand the reasoning being this. On the other hand, it attempts to ignore why denominations rise in the first place- because someone, somewhere, disagrees strongly enough with the way things are being done that they see fit to attempt to change it and persuade other people to go along with them.

In my own pursuit of Nirvana, I think I’ve swallowed way too much Christian dogmatic bullshit, attempting to fit into the mainstream or orthodox churches in a way that no person actually does without a good dose of cognitive dissonance. My approach and emphasis in life is that of a hardcore mystic; I am not interested in squabbling about hypothetical conceptions of reality but want real practice that will cause real change in my life. 

I think it’s also funny that so many people will accuse others of making God in their own image when they themselves have done the same thing; it’s strange that the older churches seem to think their faith handed down is the “once and for all” faith, never stopping to question that they, too, may be serving a particular image of Christ that they’ve formed of their own hands.

Just because more people were involved in the shaping of the fault doesn’t mean that it’s more true; it only means it’s more complex because more people contributed to it!

Here Endeth the Rant

Stevo 

On Being One’s Individual Self, More on Bernadette Roberts, and Various Rantings

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Instead of engaging in Contemplative Prayer (which is what I should be doing), I am instead writing a bit about an insight I had earlier.

 

To counterbalance this grand insight, I ended up cutting myself shaving. I do think this is the whole paradox of reality- we recognize some powerful and great Truth which is then curbed by the distressing and often annoying realities of common life.

 

Unfortunately, I do spend too much time reading theology online, along with forums and people’s opinions on various matters of religion. I’ve done so less and less as time as progressed, rightly curbing such an atrocious habit, but it does possess me here and again.

 

Naturally, with my Jungian and mystical leanings to things, I do take it upon myself to Google Jung and Catholicism.

 

Some article or another popped up one day that, of course, was blasting Jung and the “liberalism” of certain Catholics who seem to think the goal of the Tradition is just to find the “Authentic Self” and apply this to the idea that the universal quest of all religion is to find the “Authentic Self,” and there ends the quest.

 

This is partially correct. However, the issue that many mystics seem to be pressing, and the issue that I discovered when I was age 15, is that there is a point where one transcends the Higher/Authentic Self.

 

The notion that there may be something beyond the Higher Self, or that the Higher Self could even be lost, is troubling and perplexing to many people who don’t understand how we could exist without it. However, there are some technicalities in the context of philosophical and theological definitions as to what the “soul” of a human being is, such that the soul includes body and mind.

 

Anyway, some of the issues I’ve seen recently are people’s attacking Bernadette Roberts and her particular way of viewing things. They seem to gloss over some points that she makes that are very important while dissecting her with all manner of philosophical attacks that they can, and the whole bit irritates me. I finally gave up reading that particular forum after I made it to the 8th or so page out of 18 pages of Walls of Text Coming After Me.

 

Given, I did find some of the philosophical points people were making interesting, but I think I can summarize in a better way what Bernadette is attempting to convey:

 

Instead of our having a ghost or inner spirit that pops out when we die, we have an aspect of the body that is immortal, an aspect of the body that our senses don’t normally inform us about. The Holy Eucharist, then, explains this: the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Christ while the Body and Blood don’t seemingly appear.

 

Now, this concept appeals to me, the idea of an immortal, unseen Body, because to me, it seems NOVEL. Christianity has a huge focus on the Incarnation, on physicality, and on the Sacraments being real and true and actual effective means of our receiving God.

 

I’m also not suggesting that this particular way of perceiving things should be accepted as dogma. Rather, one should test this and find out for one’s self by making the mystic’s journey, pure and simple.

 

There’s a bit of contradiction when it comes to people who perceive the Deceased and communicate with entities on the “other side,” along with comparisons of various Near Death Experiences. One wonders how these things possibly happen if it’s possible that we don’t have a thinking/feeling being that persists after the death of the body.

 

Anyway, moving on to the Insight I had earlier and referring back to the Authentic Self: as I’ve said, there’s been a new shift in my focus to try to stimulate the Third Chakra and to try to really have a sense of liking myself and who I am. The Bishop said something interesting to me prior to my Confirmation in that we have to be the person God created us to be. The problem is that this is variously understood to mean something along the lines of following a particular set of rules, but then in Catholic Christianity, the feel of it, too, is different. There is a specific measure in God’s plan that I can and should fulfill, and I have to embrace my individuality to the maximum.

 

Again, the irony that exists in trying to destroy a sense of identity and how that perpetuated my sense of self and then the embracing of a particular identity seems to erode the ego in a way I can’t precisely explain.

 

My concern has been that seeking my True Self or Ego Center might displace God. In fact, the opposite reality is what I’ve discovered: being one’s true self, finding one’s center, and living out that center, is in and of itself an act of worship. To be what God has created one to be IS a prayer, IS worship, and I’m satisfied with that.

 

I’ve heard the bit before about searching for God and finding one’s self or searching for one’s and finding God, which I think kind of illustrates this principle. I go searching for myself, and then I find myself in the Presence of God.

 

My heart chakra also seems to be able to open more freely now that I’ve been more wont to embrace the stomach chakra.

 

Another interesting thing, too, is that I’m able to enjoy my own being, my own company, and have a sense of appreciation for myself. A few times, I’ve finally felt like an adult somewhere, like there was a Bigger Me somewhere that understood things and could do things that I can’t normally do. I compare this to my finally feeling less like a child and more like a teenager; suddenly things that frightened me were more like an adventure of sorts, a fresh start, a new change that I could experience.

 

But that particular mode of being is something that requires such tremendous focus that I hope it becomes a force of habit after a while. I might well give up if I don’t get a second wind sometime soon, as it’s pretty difficult on the one hand.

 

Pax Vobiscum.

 

Beaux

 

I never know what to title these entries anymore.

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I have now received Christ in the Holy Eucharist six times at the same parish. This, perhaps, may not be anything remarkable to anyone else; however, to me, it is something that I’ve wanted to do for years and am now actually doing.

 

Whether joining the Episcopal Church is a matter of trying to create an identity and whether or not the identity I am gaining in Christ is real is all up for debate, I suppose; one thing can be said, I do feel more complete than I have in quite some time, and that, in and of itself, seems to be a step in the right direction.

 

Another interesting thing is to hear an interview with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee talking about how the mystical truths in early Christianity largely were suppressed, thus being taken over by the Muslim world- hence, Sufism.

 

At the same time, reading Paths to the Heart, a book exploring the relationship between Eastern Orthodox Christianity’s mysticism and Sufism heavily supports Llewellyn’s position on this matter. So, then, it is no wonder that I was tossed between the opposites of Catholic ritual and Sufi mysticism; they belong together and are not at war. The sense of Longing for God, of Loving God, of finding God both transcendent and immanent, is all together united.

 

At any rate, Christ has given me a new confidence in Him that I need, and it’s so strange to look back through my life to see those moments of Black Fire blazing, only to realize that Christ IS the Black Fire; my awareness of the Black Fire, then, was my becoming more mature in Christ by accepting who I am in Him and not who I am in the blasphemous idol that was created by the local churches of Christ.

 

To accept myself is to accept Christ’s work in me; it is to accept that God has a special place for me and a special plan for me in this world, and that I must live out what God has intended for me or suffer in a way that only exists for those who are inauthentic to themselves.

 

I will never stop being a mystic; in fact, mysticism is the heart of Christianity, is Christianity, and the real issue is that this basic reality has been forgotten.

 

The things I would not do for myself, I can do for Christ; I may never completely fall in love with the Lord as my Lover, except by His own grace, but we’re certainly like good friends now.

 

I realized something the other day, too; trying to categorize each religion by chakra is a silly thing to do, especially when we get to Christianity; Christianity uses ALL the chakras, though it’s true that the focus on the chakra system is almost non-existent. Most especially the heart and stomach chakras are used, as well as the throat chakra (what with the emphasis on singing, chanting, and praying.)

This sense of completion I have is, of course, a smaller completion compared to the larger completion that must take place in life. Perhaps the reality is that we are always the smaller mystery and Christ the larger mystery, and we can never fully enter into Him as we should.

 

But what I really mean to say is that, no matter how complete I am at this moment, there is still something greater to be completed, something greater to be done.

 

Yet the gratitude that’s pouring forth from me now is amazing; it’s happening mostly from an unconscious level, so I’m barely aware that anything’s going on, but it is, it IS going on!

 

Whether or not I should write about this in particular, I’m not sure, but recently, I acquired St. Augustine’s Prayerbook. In the prayerbook is a Novena to the Holy Spirit- and I plan to undertake the Novena just prior to Confirmation. This seems like an appropriate devotion to do before receiving the Holy Spirit.

 

Methinks what’s happening now is that the actual grace of the Holy Eucharist is reactivating the sanctifying grace of Holy Baptism that I received when I was younger- and perhaps my own religious devotions come largely because I DID receive Baptism and was sensitive enough to it, devoted enough to God, that God worked through all the heresy and blasphemy of the church and school I attended.

I pray that God would deliver us all into unity with Him.

 

Amen, and Amen.

 

Beaux

 

Mystical Experience Updates

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First off, today marked my fourth Mass at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Ozark, Alabama. That tops the three Masses I went to at St. Mark’s in Troy, Alabama. The main thing that has changed: I am going to Mass for Christ and not for myself. That’s an incredible shift in my own consciousness.

Another good point is that since I am single at this point in my life, I attend Mass with a full dedication to Christ and can put my full focus on Him. I felt a bit uncomfortable before when I went with my then-boyfriend, as I felt I was ignoring him or not giving him the due attention. However, there was also the reality that we weren’t totally able to be open about our relationship and so on at the church on the one hand, so perhaps that played into it.

The mystical experiences to note:

One night, I had the experience of everyone being part of the Body of Christ. The mystical Body of Christ is a reality, not a metaphor. Unfortunately, Christianity often enough gets everything backwards: what is literal is taken as symbolic and what is symbolic is taken as literal. This is highly bothersome.

At any rate, the experience accorded to me that everyone is a part of THE BODY of Christ, that we are substantially, in a flesh-and-blood sort of way, made out of His very Body. Receiving the Eucharist reveals this Truth in our own bodies- the Truth of our Oneness with God and each other. This is a very real and vital sort of thing, not just a strange, flowing, undefined energetic sort of way; it’s like being a great, organic body, connected in a direct and real manner.

The next experience: as I drove to Mass today, I had the experience of Christ being on the cross, high in the sky, and all reality being united to Him. Then, I had the experience of seeing myself melt away, along with all people melt away, to reveal that underneath, we are all actually Christ. So to treat another human being in a certain way is verily to treat Christ in that way.

This comes around to a picture that my friend Richard posted recently of a man shooting heroin into his vein, showing that in doing so, he, too, is shooting heroin into the body of Jesus. The point, then, is that not only is it a matter of what we do to another person, BUT HOW WE TREAT OURSELVES, a point that is not emphasized enough in Christianity.

In the Second Great Commandment of Christ, we are told to love our neighbor as ourselves; the implication, then, is that we must FIRST love ourselves, for if we hate ourselves, we will hate our neighbor as well.

The final revelation that occurred today happened as I took a walk and, with my mala-turned-chotki, I prayed the Name of Jesus or the so-called Jesus Prayer. After a time, I began to see the shimmering in everything; there’s a strange shimmering that’s appeared more and more these days, perhaps a function of meditating more on the Third Eye. Either way, I see a light, a shimmering, in things that I have only begun seeing since a little before starting to go to Mass and probably after I started doing the meditation on the Secret of the Golden Flower.

All I can say is, “Praise be to God.”

I hope my words can be of use to others, that they either take encouragement from them or find parallels in their own mysticism.

Beaux

Mass at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Ozark, Alabama

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For the first time in over a year, I attended Mass again, this time at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Ozark, Alabama.

 

The church is small, quite small, and I went alone; this was a big deal for me, as I had to drive half an hour to get there, and I’m unaccustomed to going places alone.

 

Call me crazy, call me ballsy, call me whatever, but I was bloody-minded enough (read: insanely determined) that I was going to go to this freely available Mass tonight, because I was actually awake and had the chance and all that jazz.

 

I didn’t go for myself, ultimately, either; I went for Christ. I kept reminding myself that I was doing this for Christ and not for me, which helped me more to understand what the Sufis mean about surrendering to the Will of God.

 

The priest, Father Tom, was especially welcoming; especially since I ended up arriving a half-hour early for the service. He asked me normal questions, and then people began showing up; they introduced themselves, and I enjoyed the small congregation of only 12 people tonight.

 

The Mass was actually just the communion part; there was no sermon or singing, praise be to God. I do like hymns, and they do have an organ (a small, electrical one), but getting to the good stuff of the Lord Christ is what makes me a happy panda.

 

I’ve never been to such a welcoming church before. I’ve also never been to a church that kept so many Catholic elements for being such a heavily via media church. (They, in fact, had the prayer candles- the votive candles lit when one says a prayer- and we all said, “Amen” after receiving communion, and everyone crossed themselves. This didn’t happen at St. Mark’s in Troy, where they even had a quite visible Tabernacle!)

 

Of course, I shouldn’t read into that sort of thing, either; the important thing is that I went, and I saw Christ proclaimed magnificently in the Episcopal Church once again with a lovely group of people who are indeed the Body of Christ.

 

Receiving the Eucharist did something for me this time, among these beautiful, loving people, and I know that Christ somehow transformed me within, and that I should go receive communion as often as possible. God has done something amazing, something that I don’t fully understand but can palpably feel inside of me.

 

Maybe I am simply more open to God now. Maybe I have matured somewhere inside of myself. Who knows the why and the how? I am concerned only with the fact that receiving communion has changed me in a way I wasn’t expecting, in that same, real manner that’s true- something that is real just IS.

 

After Mass, we had a soup and salad dinner; naturally, I asked if there was any meat in the soup, and someone checked for me. Turns out it was she-crab soup, and it was absolutely amazing; the salad wasn’t half bad, either, and I had a glass of wonderful sweet tea.

 

Then Father Tom gave a semi-humorous presentation on the Top Ten Failed Evangelism Ideas. People commented and tried to figure out how to best help evangelize in the community; the ultimate idea came back around to Facebook and Youtube.

So, in a way, I suppose I’m doing my part.

 

The Episcopal Church is, in many ways, a mess, yet there is undeniably a statement of truth- they accept everyone, especially this parish. They accept absolutely everyone, regardless of race, creed, or sexual orientation. (I should note that a gay couple made up part of tonight’s congregation!)

 

A few of my other devoted friends have ended up in the Episcopal Church. True, the mystic in me will never relent from my heresies, but perhaps that’s exactly what will ultimately grant the Episcopal Church its greatest strength- the outcasts who hold a piece of Christ’s Mystery that was never written down and given the Seal of Approval.

St. Michael’s is an openly and avowed gay-friendly church; this is true for the priest and the congregation, as I experienced first-hand tonight. You will feel welcome, no matter who you are!

Praise be to God, and let us proclaim the ultimate Mystery of Christ’s love.

You can visit their Facebook page here.

 

Beaux

 

 

 

 

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