The Great Nothing

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AUTHOR’S NOTE: I wrote this a few days ago, then decided not to publish it because it was so late. But here I am now, publishing it, so it isn’t quite as current as it looks. That doesn’t undermine the importance of it.

An experience I’ve had but twice happened upon me today, and this was the second time said experience happened.

The first time, it happened like a crack of thunder due to a synchronicity, and I was catapulted into a no-man’s land of voids.

This time, it crept up on me, over the course of a few days; the preceding days have seen me somewhat irate, so it was good to know that the irritation was ultimately indicative of something happening.

When this experienced happened the first time, I had a synchronicity dealing with an old lover, a statement made by Meister Eckhart, and a song in which that quote was found. At this point in time, I had been interested in Gnosticism/Catholicism for almost two years, and in the course of a few seconds, my entire world view came crashing down around me in shambles.

Suddenly, there was no God, there was no Christ, there was not value in anything- with the exception of that one person I had loved. This experience continued for a few days, I came out of it, and went back to my spiritual pursuits.

That time, in a way, I fought agains the experience with an intellectualization of it. This time, I didn’t fight it- I simply embraced it, knowing that it wasn’t the end, that this Great Meaningless Void is more like a veil, not an end in itself.

The Great Meaningless Emptiness just suddenly happened upon me, and all the friendly and beautiful notions and abstractions about spirituality and mysticism fell away. And I let them fall away. I let my concepts of God fall away, all those things.

Slowly, they’re returning, but not because I’m forcing them to. I’m just riding with my feelings, with my emotions, with my thoughts, and seeing what happens. I am merely an observer in all this.

The Great Dark Meaninglessness isn’t hurting my feelings or bothering me, either. It’s simply there, and I’m slowly moving inside it and then away from it again.

What does it all mean? Maybe I’ll find out, maybe I won’t.

Beaux


Holy Sophia and the Blessed Virgin Mary

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An interesting observation made itself known to me earlier yesterday concerning Holy Sophia and the Blessed Virgin Mary.

This observation is somewhat abstract, so please attempt to bear with me as I try to express it.

The basic pattern is this: Holy Sophia, who is an Aeon, an emanation or aspect of God and therefore Spirit, gives birth to the Demiurge and to Matter. The Demiurge causes the “Fall” of reality.

The Blessed Virgin Mary, who is human, gives birth to the Lord Jesus Christ, who is God and Man; He redeems the Matter that is the universe and triumphs over the Demiurge and Archons; Christ redeems reality and Creation from the Fall.

In this, the Blessed Virgin Mary reflects and corrects in the earthly realms what happened in the pleroma.

So, what we see is that SPIRIT gives birth to MATTER; MATTER gives birth to a fusion of SPIRIT and MATTER, whereby MATTER is REDEEMED (and returned) to the SPIRIT.

This is by no means an in-depth explanation, but it is something worth noting and has several implications psychologically and spiritually. More than anything, the connection struck me as an interesting one.

Beaux


Heirs to the Tradition that is Christianity I

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Many people do not necessarily understand why I even bother with Christianity, in any form, at this point in my life or in the progression of humanity. I established this blog in part for the sake of explaining, in as much length and grandeur and detail as I might deem appropriate, precisely why I would continue to bother with Christianity.

The problem is that the projection of Christianity is often one of conservatism and fanaticism. Christianity is claimed most loudly and boldly by, for want of better terms, the stupid and the hateful.

The people who attempt to deal with these things by holding varying theological opinions or, God forbid, actually doing research and inner spiritual work are quickly labeled as “progressive” and “liberal” and demonized as attempting to destroy the Gospel and as Satan’s henchmen.

Another form of Christianity we often see is a watered-down, semi-therpeutic variety that screams about the transformative power of Jesus but offers none of said transformation; people so often give the spiel about how Jesus Christ can heal you and offer it and offer it and offer it, and so rarely does it ever happen.

Salvation, too, has been watered down from an actual ontological alteration of the human being on all levels (body, soul, and spirit) into a new creature, a process which is lengthy and devastating in many regards, to simply being a mental event in which you shift gears and start using the secret password of “Jesus is Lord.”

I, for one, do not buy into the notion of the so-called “getting saved” or “salvation experience” that is marketed by evangelical Protestantism; it’s the equivalent of putting a band-aid on cancer and saying someone has been truly transformed. This is, however, a blog for another day.

Christianity does not belong exclusively to people who are ultra-conservative, hateful, dogmatic, and rigid; it is a system, a religion, a faith, a revelation of God to mankind as a whole. There is a nucleus to it, an essence, a core of Love, yes; there are sustaining aspects, manifestations and references back to the essence that is the Love of Christ, which take many forms; there are traditions and scriptures that refer to the essence that is the Love of Christ and through which Christ speaks to all mankind.

Christianity is not solely understood through a literalistic, immediate reading of the Scriptures, which is a point that, incidentally, both fundamentalists and atheists alike often miss.

Fundamentalists and those who believe in Biblical inerrancy on all matters scientific, social, and otherwise, will insist that if God wanted us to know something, He would spell it out, and that is that, never considering that maybe what God has told us is something that is quite powerful, perhaps too powerful for an ordinary and easily corruptible person to be given, as they could cause harm.

Likewise, fundamentalists are often people who want things spelled out for them, like dogmatists. Dogmatists differ from fundamentalists in that they may not accept Biblical inerrancy, but they accept Church Authoritarianism and Pronouncement as the absolute authority on all matters. Either way, both groups are likely to argue and throw around the word “liberal” as though it were a slur. These are the sort of people who, in reality, are so very confused and doubtful of their own faith and understanding of religion that they scream with fury at anyone who dares question it.

Provided, it is far more comfortable in reality to have something spelled out for you, so you know where the boundaries are, you know what rules to follow, and you don’t get in trouble. However, that’s not really how God and His Reality work, so…be wary.

Atheists, (and by atheists, I mean more the Modern Evangelical Atheists, not your garden-variety doesn’t-really-care type atheist) also ask stupid questions, such as, “What else could it mean but the surface meaning?” These are the sort of people who look around, and not seeing a man on a throne, declare there is no God, no meaning to life, that they can do whatever they want, that we live in an irrational universe but use rational means to understand the universe, think that if you are at all interested in religion that you’re a complete, ignorant nitwit…you get the picture.

But getting back to my blog: we are all the heirs of the Tradition of Christianity; it does not belong solely to one denomination or another or one theological persuasion or another.

It is the duty of people of any culture to carry on the customs of that culture, and the religious rites of a culture, in so far as they are not hurting anyone, by practicing those religious rites.

One thing we must remember is that the Tradition of Christianity has produced immensely valuable tools for spiritual journey. Somehow, whether by intuition or by other means, I can perceive these so-called “tools” in Christianity very well. Having been raised in a Christian context and having had a familiarity with the symbolism from an early age, I can easily relate to them in a way that I cannot with other religions. That doesn’t mean I find the traditions of other religions any less alluring, but they are less immediately connected to me, my culture, and my own psychic heritage, if you will.

In many cases, it is difficult to separate the spiritual current running through a religion and the cultural context in which the religion evolved. There are many, many cultural artifacts which are written into the Bible, into Tradition, hold-overs from a different era that are not Divine Mandates but rather world views as those people understood the universe according to their science and culture at the time.

Yet these are the very things that so many people become so nit-picky over! The leftover garbage that happens to be the incidentals and not the meaning of the story suddenly become deified and elevated to the level of Holiness, and frankly, if you will forgive my harshness, enough of us have smelled the bullshit long enough.

On track again: I cannot know if any of my ancestors were ever Buddhists or Hindus. I can know with some certainty that many of my ancestors in the last 2000 years were Roman Catholic, and with greater certainty that some of my ancestors within the last 500 years were Anglican.

Thus I can reason that my own ancestors at some point worshiped in a soaring church buildings and knelt at the altar to take the Lord Jesus Christ in the Holy Eucharist, and somehow, feeling that connection with them and with Europe is important to me.

As I write this blog, it is late, and I’m tired, so I’ll have to return to the theme at a later time.

Beaux


Mysticism

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As this blog and many of my writings often refer back to the fact that I am a mystic, it would be helpful if some kind of working definition were provided to explain precisely what I mean by the word “mystic.”

To my own knowledge, there are several different uses for the word “mystic,” and this is precisely why it will help to explain what I mean when I say “mysticism” and “mystic.”

According to the dictionary on my computer:

mystic |ˈmistik| noun

a person who seeks by contemplation and self-surrender to obtain unity with or absorption into the Deity or the absolute, or who believes in the spiritual apprehension of truths that are beyond the intellect.

That definition resonates very well, as abstract as it may be. Contemplation as read above is defined more so in the Christian sense, whereby “contemplation” and “contemplative prayer” are analogous to what we Westerners now call “meditation” that comes from the East, e.g., clearing and stilling one’s mind.

Gladly I would admit the above definition at any time.

According to Dictionary.com:

mys-tic

-adjective

1. involving or characterized by esoteric, otherworldly, or symbolic practices or content, as certain religious ceremonies and art; spiritually significant; ethereal.

2. of the nature of or pertaining to mysteries known only to the initiated: mystic rites.

3. of occult character, power, or significance: a mystic formula.

4. of obscure or mysterious character or significance.

5. of or pertaining to mystics or mysticism.

–noun

6. a person who claims to attain, or believes in the possibility of attaining, insight into mysteries transcending ordinary human knowledge, as by direct communication with the divine or immediate intuition in a state of spiritual ecstasy.

7. a person initiated into religious mysteries.

Mysticism, from Dictionary.com:

Mysticism, noun

1. the beliefs, ideas, or mode of thought of mystics.

2. a doctrine of an immediate spiritual intuition of truths believed to transcend ordinary understanding, or of a direct, intimate union of the soul with god through contemplation or ecstasy.

3. obscure thought or speculation.

Definition 2 would resonate with what I mean, followed closely by definition 1, and I would outright reject definition 3 in terms of what I mean when I say “mysticism.”

These definitions, too, summarily tell us as much about mysticism as we can immediately tread within the confines on my own blog.

So what do I mean when I say “mysticism” if we go beyond the technical definitions? What do I mean in saying that I am a mystic?

I mean to say that it is my own experience, my own direct encounter with God, the Absolute, the Ultimate Reality, or whatever term you may like to use, that counts, that allows for Salvation, that allows for Freedom, and that is not the product of a book, of a ritual, or of the authority of some outside source.

That does not mean that I think outside references to God are completely and utterly worthless; time and time again I will repeat how the Sacraments and Sacred Scriptures of various traditions are extremely important if understood in the proper context, and I think the whole mess that Religion proves itself to be so often is that said the majority of people who practice those religions have no clue what’s really going on or supposed to be going on but smugly assume that they and their backwards interpretation of things constitute the entire Truth of Reality.

Typically I try to watch out for people who assume that they know everything and that they and they alone have the Truth, because those people are usually the ones who are the most dangerous and hateful. Mystically speaking, everyone is privy to the Truth and has the birthright of coming to God- but no one is forced or evangelized to be a mystic, and mystics, as a general rule, tend to be accepting of other people’s Faiths and Traditions and seek the underlying Reality that is God in every human being and in every practice.

Then again, I understand that I cannot speak for any other mystic, only this mystic! That doesn’t disqualify this as my general understanding of things, however.

I realize in writing all these things that it sounds incredibly abstract and ethereal, and the truth is that mysticism often works with a level of reality seemingly so subtle that the only way to even begin to express anything of it is to speak in extreme abstractions.

People often ask me what I “believe,” and in essence, they’re questioning my basic world view, wondering what it might be. Most of what I’ve written above counts for that, though it may be a little more detailed. The mystic world view is the basic, absolute core of how I view things, and even then I realize it’s subject to change depending on the situation. However, mysticism is often fluid enough to where such changes are not a terrible thing.

The problem is in trying to express mysticism in every day language and in finding an appropriate religious context in which to pour the energy. This is what has produced, in the minds of the people that I know, my apparent “changing of religions so often.” The reality is that my core “beliefs” never change, or rarely do, and that a different set of symbolism in a religion suddenly comes up to me and speaks to me.

My own conflict with religion is that so often the “orthodox” (from the Greek meaning “correct belief”) views constrict the mystery and life out of the religious experience, and then claim that whoever disagrees with them is a heretic and must be excommunicated. The other difference is that the orthodoxy of many religions requires you simply swallow whatever they teach you with no questions, and then go on your merry way just nodding your head in agreement.

Mysticism, on the other hand, provides the doctrines, rituals, and symbols as guideposts in a religion- they refer to the Living God, they symbolize the Living God, they speak and attempt to meagerly proclaim the Living God, but they are not the Living God in all His Absolute Glory; experience them, yes, but experience them in order to experience God.

Yes, it all goes back to the direct, one-on-one encounter with God, and I must say I’m quite fine with knowing for myself as opposed to putting my belief in someone else’s belief in someone else’s experience.

Praise be to God!

Beaux


Memoirs of My Religion III

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During my post-Christian era, the major religions that came to the forefront for me were Wicca and Buddhism. What I liked about them specifically, I’ll try to spell out here, as they were symbolic of the larger struggle that I experience even to this day.

Wicca appealed to me for the sake of power and by virtue that all was related to nature. Allow me to first back up, though, and bring out something else:

When I was in 5th grade, the movie The Craft came out. Magic had always interested me, specifically the kind you see wizards and witches using (I was obsessed with the Wicked Witch of the West as a child), and The Craft, when I finally saw it, brought out a theological point that I didn’t quite understand.

Namely, that theological point occurs when Sarah asks about Manon.

Nancy explains that Manon is like God and the Devil- that it’s everything. It’s the moon, it’s the rocks, it’s the trees. If God and the Devil were playing football, Manon would be the stadium they played on, it would be the Sun that shown down on them.

And provided, this concept of God resonates heavily with the concept of Brahman from the Hindu traditions, and the reality is that it magnifies God to be much larger and more inclusive than the evangelical Christian idea of God. There’s not a lot of room for argument on that.

Thus, Wicca was in. In the more orthodox sense of Wicca (if such a statement can be made), there is actually the worship of a God and a Goddess. They are, however, synonymous with Nature in most cases, and the question of whether they’re actual anthropomorphic spirits, personified energetic currents, archetypes, or symbols is often a moot point in the actual practice of Wicca.

The structure of Wiccan ritual was neatly defined. The theology was laid out, and as far magic and casting spells went, this was largely left up to the practitioner.

There’s an entire blog I’ll have to write about the politics within Wicca and the larger Pagan and Neo-Pagan community, along with the realm of arguing who is and isn’t Wiccan and who is and isn’t a witch.

Naturally, as a teenager outside the mainstream, using the edgier term “witch” was totally in with me. Also, I had a tendency to be drawn more towards spells and spell-books, and naturally I missed the deeper spiritual current that existed in Wicca.

The other majorly influential religion at this time was Buddhism. Buddhism was and is part and parcel of Japanese culture as well as the culture of East Asia in general. Buddhism also afforded me something that seemed more realistic- the concept of Nirvana, a state of being in which one experiences bliss, compassion, and wisdom. The ethical arguments of the Buddhists, the principles of meditation and the rational explanations that were given appealed to my highly skeptical mind.

But Wicca and Buddhism had serious theological conflicts. Now that I look back, I see they are in reality not as conflicted as I thought, and I have managed to gather what the crux of the problem is, glossing over it in other entries.

In the end, it went something like this: I was Buddhist as my religion, but not Wiccan as my religion. I practiced magic, yes, but not in terms of a religious structure.

Around this same time, a former friend, the same one who introduced me to comparative religion and the Astrotheology I had been so avid about a few years before, began to pursue Sufism because of his philosophy teacher.

Sufism, in a nutshell and by most people, would be classified simply as Islamic mysticism. The current of Sufism my friend brought was not quite like that.

Sufism was all about love. Love, Longing, and God. God was everything, and everything was God. The concepts were highly analogous to Buddhism but made use of Western religious words and imagery. The Sufis largely were everything that the fundamentalist Muslims were not- loving, embracing, tolerant, filled with a love for God and all mankind and wanting peace in the world.

The current of Sufism affected me, somehow. I’m still not sure when it took, when it began to happen, but I firmly believe even now that God cried out to me then in a way that I had never heard Him.

Then came the dark era. The same friend introduced me to a website called the Actual Freedom Trust. The AFT claimed to be a new, non-spiritual way to find liberation. Their leader, Richard, claimed to have found a state no one else had ever been in and developed a method to find that state.

Somehow, they really brought me to a point of fear, a point of, “What if when we die, we really do just stop existing?” that caused me to become one of their blind followers. The only solution, if we just die when we die, is to seek out this state Richard’s talking about!

This was my next real experience with cults.

My critical thinking skills were not sharp enough at the time, and inability to question authority except in extreme cases of abuse led me to swallow huge amounts of Actual Freedom “dogma.” Intuitively, I knew something was wrong, though I was unable to articulate exactly what it was about the AFT that bothered me so much.

I fought against their concepts but felt the pressure of the authority prevented me from thinking for myself.

At this time, I declared myself an avowed atheist, I became more arrogant and self-righteous than I had ever been (after all, I suddenly found the “right” religion again), and I was literally more miserable than I had ever been before.

Off and on again there was an internal battle with Actual Freedom, and finally at the beginning of 2006, I managed to completely shirk the 3 year long battle and move on with my life.

One of my first assessments of the AFT prior to my swallowing their dogma was that they were simply parroting mysticism of old, and even though it was repackaged and resold teachings of all the world’s traditions, they acted like they had something new- but it wasn’t. It was simply mysticism put in extremely materialistic terms. Numerous people would say things to get approval, and numerous other people said stupid things to try to explain to the poor idiotic fools who didn’t agree with them just why they were wrong.

Making an open comparison between Actualism and Mysticism was tantamount to heresy and created all kinds of ridicule of just how wrong people were.

Eventually the abuses, the lies, the contradictions, the blatant superiority complex of Richard and his followers, and failure of the method to deliver what it promised it would deliver to me caught up with me, and I rightly left that path.

That brings us almost into the modern era of my spirituality- almost, but not quite, which is to say we probably have two or three more blogs on this subject.

Beaux


The Experience of Identity Loss

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Under everyday circumstances, we talk about the loss of one’s identity. Often this is tied to something such as the loss of one’s career or a partner, something that definitely put you in the realm of social affairs and distinguished you in relation to other people.

However, the week before last, while journeying with Tyler and my friends somewhere, I had a more frightening version of losing my identity.

Without warning, suddenly I was quite confused as to who I was and how it was that I came to be who I am. No doubt, I could identify things such as my name, age, all the usual things; instead, there was something more crucial that suddenly seemed odd and strange and completely out of place in the scheme of reality.

This is certainly an “awareness of being aware,” a strange state of affairs where one’s own awareness stands in contradistinction to one’s personality and identity, a separation of Mind and Name might be a way to explain it better.

The first time I recall ever having such an experience as this was when I was a child, sitting in the bathtub. Suddenly the same oddness and out-of-placeness of myself hit me, of who I was, of my distinction as a person as opposed to other people in terms of individuality.

I do not mean to state that I was unaware that others exist; of course I was aware of that, and of course I am now aware that others are aware. This is a wholly different experience, one that is confusing at best and likely anxiety-provoking at worse.

Perhaps one might call it an awareness of being who one is. Perhaps it is the remnant of a child-like impression of who I was, an outside imposed notion of who I was as opposed to who I really am on the inside.

I realize that stating all these things is quite subtle, and only those who have been through the experience can begin to fathom and relate on what I mean.

The truth is that experiences that others have not had, perceptions and differing degrees of awareness, are ultimately the very “business” I’m in, for want of better terms. Mysticism revolves around this sort of ineffability.

I do want to make it clear that what happened was not the same as the disappearance of the Ego, which is the sudden and blatant absence of the “I” that normally resounds most loudly in the mind. That, too, is an experience that mystics all the time mention, and yet until one encounters it for one’s self, it sounds like pure rubbish.

Perhaps someone out there can give insight into what exactly this experience means or refer me to others who have had it.

Beaux


The Seven Sacraments and the Seven Chakras

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While in bed one night, I suddenly had the realization that the Seven Sacraments of the Christian Church line up rather well with the Seven Chakras in the human body.

Some of you who are unaware of the older traditions in Christianity may be wondering what a sacrament is. Here, I’ll provide a few definitions that I think are suitable.

According to question 152 of the Gnostic Catechism,

A sacrament is a sacred rite; the visible and outward sign of an invisible, inward grace of God. Anciently, a sacrament was called a mystery.

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the second half of Paragraph 1084 reads,

The sacraments are perceptible signs (words and actions) accessible to our human nature. By the action of Christ and the power of the Holy Spirit they make present efficaciously the grace that the signify.

Paragraph 1116 reads,

Sacraments are “powers that come forth” from the Body of Christ, which is ever-living and life-giving. They are actions of the Holy Spirit at work in his Body, the Church. They are “the masterworks of God” in the new and everlasting covenant.

The first problem we run into deals largely with the number of sacraments. Arguments among denominations arise at this point.

Officially, the Catholic Church declares there are seven sacraments. While the Anglican Communion states that there are two great sacraments, namely Baptism and Communion, largely within Anglicanism there are seven recognized.

The exoteric church’s sacraments are

  • Baptism
  • Confirmation
  • Holy Eucharist
  • Holy Matrimony
  • Penance
  • Holy Orders
  • Extreme Unction

Now, according to the Gnostic Church and furthermore, explicitly according to the Gospel of Philip, there are five initiatory sacraments, two sustaining sacraments, and two substitutional sacraments. Two of the five initiatory sacraments have been long forgotten in the exoteric churches.

  • Baptism
  • Confirmation
  • Holy Eucharist
  • Redemption
  • Bride-Chamber

The sustaining sacraments:

  • Holy Orders
  • Extreme Unction

And lastly, the substitutional sacraments:

  • Penance
  • Holy Matrimony

This adds up to nine sacraments for the Gnostic Church.

Whew, that’s a lot of info packed in such a short time, isn’t it?

Now, let’s see how these line up with the seven chakras.

Baptism would correspond to the first chakra, at the base of the spine. We are washed at birth, and being baptized is a form of washing us, purifying us from original sin and suchlike. The first chakra deals with early childhood and infancy.

Confirmation typically happens, as I understand it, just prior to or during adolescence. Since during Confirmation we receive the Holy Spirit, and since religious devotion awakens often simultaneously with the awakening of sexual energy in the body, this is corresponds great to the second chakra, which deals with emotions and sexuality.

The Holy Eucharist, which is the source and summit of the Christian faith, corresponds to the stomach chakra- which deals with things like identity, will, and power. It is interesting that the food corresponds to part of us that digests it. The Holy Eucharist is the effective means by which Christ is made manifest on Earth- His Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity. In taking the Holy Eucharist, we effectively “commune” with Christ.

Holy Matrimony, which deals with love and marriage, corresponds to the heart chakra. Are you beginning to the pattern yet? The heart chakra also deals with emotions, primarily such things as love, compassion, and affection.

Penance, which requires going to a Priest to confess one’s sins, corresponds to the throat chakra, and often the penance imposed deals with prayer. The throat chakra deals with expression and artistic vision, and so you can see well how this overlaps with things such as confession and penance.

Holy Orders corresponds to the third-eye chakra, which deals with being a seer, having intellectual functions, psychic powers, and so on. A Priest has an indelible mark placed on his soul in being ordained. To become a Priest, he must study and go through initiation such that his own self-knowledge is expanded and so that he can properly instruct the faithful in the religion.

Extreme Unction, the anointing of the sick, would correspond to the crown chakra. The crown chakra deals with God, a connection to the absolute and divine. Extreme Unction is given to people who are ill and especially to people who are on their deathbed- people who are about to met God.

This is a rough sort of sketch of how the chakras and sacraments correspond, but likely you get the idea.

What of the Sacrament of Redemption and the Sacrament of the Bride-Chamber?

First, since Redemption has been replaced by Penance, it would likely correspond to the throat chakra. Bride-Chamber would likely correspond to the heart chakra in the same way, but both are probably understood to correspond to deeper levels of these respective chakras.

The Sacrament of Redemption is understood in a specifically Gnostic way, dealing with the Archons and freeing one’s Spirit from them and so on. The Bride-Chamber, too, has a similar and more advanced purpose, but as I am no authority on these matters, I cannot speak about them in great detail.

These were just some more thoughts that were rumbling around in my head late one night.

Beaux


The Grace of God

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No worries, everyone, I’ll continue writing on the Memoirs of my religion in due time.

In the meantime, I should like to turn to an experience that I’ve had recently, meaning yesterday, in fact.

Different faiths would likely call this experience different things, and coming from the Western world, the most apt explanation is to say that it is the perceptible descent of God’s Grace.

While I stood with my friends in a circle, as we were getting ready to go out to eat for my friend’s birthday, suddenly I felt that familiar, warm, golden glow filling me. Nothing less than the Grace of God had descended upon us.

The experience continued for maybe an hour, and I was filled with a sense of deep love and gratitude, the likes of which only the most fortunate among us are ever able to experience. Even for that short time, that experience was extremely powerful and left a definite impression upon me.

Now, to understand theologically what Grace is, ultimately we must turn to the Christian tradition and see that Grace is some kind of mercy or outpouring of blessings from God that are either wholly or partially unmerited.

According to the Gnostic catechism,

“Grace is the effective manifestation of the supernal Life of God, appearing to us as a supernatural gift of God bestowed on us through Gnosis and also other means.”

Gnosis is here defined.

“Gnosis is the revelatory and salvific knowledge of who we were, of what we have become, of where we were, of wherein we have been thrown, of whereto we are hastening, of what we are being freed, of what birth really is, and of what rebirth really is. This is an ancient definition which is still accurate.”

Notwithstanding, the experience of Grace this past Sunday was by no means merited, for I had done nothing to call upon God or to merit the outpouring on the energy, and yet there it was.

Grace certainly gives me the impression that things are as they are meant to be- feeling God’s presence shower upon us in the moment, knowing that we are all doing exactly what God means for us to do in that moment. This is both a humbling and hallowing encounter with the Ultimate Reality.

Unnerving is the fact that the Ultimate Reality does seem to indeed intervene in daily life, right in the middle of human affairs, and the intervention was absolutely astonishing at a moment that was otherwise so simple and innocent.

I would also like to point out that in my own experience, God’s Grace also dscends at certain times of the year, especially around the High Holy Days and the changing of the seasons. I knew the moment the Grace came during the Autumn Equinox, and it is a most peaceful, blissful experience.

I’ve written enough for the moment. Likely, I’ll write more later.

Beaux

Foreshadowing: Basic Info on Craving Aletheia

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As promised, I’ll address the differences between this blog and Holy Poached Eggs.

1. Here, I’ll be dealing with spirituality and mysticism. Likely I’ll cover a huge amount of territory and will not be as coherent or focused as HPE. Religion in general is an enormous topic that cannot be succinctly described and neatly pushed into a specific topic. To the extent that I can, I’ll attempt to give a break-down of things and make short blogs on occasion, but don’t expect that to be the norm.

2. Very likely, my blogs on here will be lengthy and spattered with a greater degree of verbosity than Holy Poached Eggs. In other words, I don’t plan to write simply for the sake of other people’s pleasure; instead, I’ll be writing intense articles that otherwise would stay swinging around in my brain, and I’ll leave the reader to his own discretion of what to think or take away from the conversation.

3. While I have no problem with people commenting or opening a dialog, any kind of argument that is begun that is disrespectful will quickly be reduced to silence. In the domain of my blog, I maintain the autocratic, god-like position to determine who can and cannot speak, and while I encourage differing opinions and varying perspectives that are not necessarily synonymous with my own, outright flaming and idiocy are not only discouraged but prevented.

4. I am passionate, if not outright obsessive, about religion and spirituality, and I choose freely to channel that obsession for the sake of other people along with the sake of sheer expressiveness and creativity. This is a huge component to my personality, so much that I created this new blog for the sake of sharing it.

5. Always read between the lines. In reality, I plan to say more than I actually say, and it’s quite likely that on some level of the Soul, I’ll express things that I didn’t realize I was going to express. Be prepared. Once this unleashed, once the floodgates open, nothing will stop it.

6. I will record and detail things such as dreams and actual mystical experiences I’ve had. Mystical experiences can seem to those who have not had them to be alien and perhaps delusional; without making judgment, I would like to ask everyone to understand that no matter what the reality behind an experience is, the experience still happened nonetheless. Please bear this in mind.

7. If anyone, at any time, needs any clarification about what I mean or the terminology I use (which may be full of jargon or have a specific meaning or background), please, feel free to ask for clarification, as said clarification may lead to writing yet another blog and will further us all.

Beaux


Outlet

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The truth is that I’m after Truth.

The truth is, spirituality and religion mean so much to me, so much more than I can begin to express to anyone at any given time.

But let’s be succinct in sharing this history.

I blogged on DeadJournal for years, then on MySpace, posting over 1000 entries. In the Spring of this year (2010), I gave up blogging on MySpace for a more “professional” attempt at writing on a blog on the South and more specifically on food (which you can find at holypoachedegg.wordpress.com.)

The lack of blogging on religion has really gotten to me, whether it’s the need to connect with others who have a similar world view, to gain their feedback, to educate them, or to simply express something about reality that has excited me so.

In an effort to not bore those around me who have different interests, I’ve decided to open this blog on religion. Things will be a little different here than on Holy Poached Eggs, and as I’m tired, I’ll address these things in blog number two.

This is my outlet. Welcome, one and all.

Beaux

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